Building Resilient Learners, Teachers and Education systems in South Sudan and Uganda

The Resilient Learners, Teachers and Education systems in South Sudan and Uganda is a four year project funded by the European Union under the BRiCE (Building Resilience in Crises through Education) thematic programme. This project is aimed at improving and strengthening the non-formal and formal education system, targeting teachers and educators in Uganda refugee settlements and South Sudan communities.

  • Rosemary Jomo 16years old Photo: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Rosemary is the head of a household of four younger brothers.

    Rosemary’s mother refused to leave her home in South Sudan but insisted that her children should go in order to save their lives and pursue an education. Now all of them are in school and Rosemary plays at the school’s soccer team.

  • Kevin, Laticha and Gifty, students at Aywee primary school, Palabek settlement. Photo: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Kevin, Laticha and Gifty are students at Aywee Primary School in Palabek settlement. Like most children, Kevin, Laticha and Gifty still bear the experience of war including fear. At school they feel good that they are on the path to a brighter future.

  • Omara David Okora is a trained teacher at World View Primary School and a refugee from South Sudan. Photo:Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Omara David Okora is 28 years, trained teacher and a refugee from South Sudan. David now works at World View Primary School in Palabek Settlement in Uganda. 


    “Education is the future for these refugee children. When in school we teach them life skills and how to respect each other. At school former enemies become friends.”

  • Francis Ocaya is a teacher at Ogili Hill Nursery and Primary Schoo, Palabek Settlement, Uganda. Photo credit: Emmanuel Maseruka/Oxfam

    Francis Ocaya is a teacher at Ogili Hill Nursery and Primary School in Palabek Settlement in Uganda.
    When teachers are trained in giving psycho-social support, they are able to cater to traumatized children ensuring that their confidence and hope is built. This enables the children receive the learning crucial for their future.

     

  • Tony Blair, student at World View Primary School Palabek Settlement, Uganda Photo:Emmanuel Museruka
/Oxfam

    Tony is 16 years old and had been out of school for a couple of years when he reached Palabek from South Sudan. In Palabek he also had to wait while new schools were being built to accommodate the new influx of refugees. He is now in P5 and somewhat older than his peers, but he is happy.

  • Reading a book Photo credit: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Reading a book. Sufficient teaching materials are a constant challenge for the schools in the settlement and the host communities in Palabek.

  • Children playing football at World View Primary School and Nursery, Palabek Settlement, Uganda. Photo credit: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Extracurricular activities like soccer are loved by the students and important for the recruitment and retention of refugee students, but also for team building and creating respect among the children. 

     

  • Student at World View Primary School, Palabek Settlement. Photo credit: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    BRICE will support thousands of children in South Sudan and Uganda in getting the education that they are entitled to and need.

  • Beatrice Angee, teacher at Aywee nursery and primary school, Palabek Settlement. Photo credit:Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    “Some of my students are older than me, and they find it difficult respecting me. With the Accelerated Learning Program, the younger and older students will have their own learning spaces and express themselves more freely.” Beatrice is a 24-year-old refugee herself.

  • Nelson Mandela (12), student at World View Primary School, Palabek Settlement, Uganda. Photo credit: Emmanuel Museruka/Oxfam

    Nelson Mandela is a 12 year old student at World View Primary School in Palabek Settlement. Nelson fled Pajok in South Sudan in April 2017. Nelson was at school when the soldiers attacked, and he fled to the Ugandan border with fellow schoolmates. Through this program, children like Nelson Mandela will receive psycho-social support in school, so that he can begin to process some of the horrible things he has experienced.